Challenging the dominant discourse of young people from low socioeconomic backgrounds: an exploration of the educational experiences of 'academically successful' young people in further education

Mulcare, Rachael Shalene (2020). Challenging the dominant discourse of young people from low socioeconomic backgrounds: an exploration of the educational experiences of 'academically successful' young people in further education. University of Birmingham. Ap.Ed.&ChildPsy.D.

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Abstract

The current study was an exploration of the educational experiences of ‘academically successful’ young people from low socioeconomic (SE) and ethnic minority backgrounds. Research has shown that children and young people (CYP) that come from low SE backgrounds are at an increased risk of developing mental health difficulties (O’Donoghue et al, 2016; Gutman et al, 2015), presenting with attachment needs (Moullin et al, 2014) and are more likely to be exposed to neighbourhood stressors (Li et al, 2007). Information pertaining to the attainment gap of young people from disadvantaged backgrounds compared with their more advantaged counterparts is well documented, and during the current Covid-19 pandemic, disparities in the educational attainment of young people from disadvantaged backgrounds has been further emphasised in the media (Children’s Commission, 2020). Through the reflection on their educational experiences, the current study sought to explore the participants’ views related to significant facilitating factors and barriers, to their academic success. The research used interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) to conduct an in-depth analysis of the semi-structured interviews of six students from low SE and ethnic minority (predominantly South Asian) backgrounds in further education settings. The interview data were analysed utilising the stages of analysis outlined in Smith et al (2009) for IPA research. Four superordinate themes were presented: connectedness, identity, capital, and external influences on educational engagement. The findings were discussed alongside my interpretations of the data and relevant literature. The limitations of the research were outlined as well as the implications for educational psychology and wider educational practice.

Type of Work: Thesis (Doctorates > Ap.Ed.&ChildPsy.D.)
Award Type: Doctorates > Ap.Ed.&ChildPsy.D.
Supervisor(s):
Supervisor(s)EmailORCID
Soan, ColetteUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Williams, HuwUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Licence: All rights reserved All rights reserved
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Social Sciences
School or Department: School of Education
Funders: None/not applicable
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
L Education > L Education (General)
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/10897

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