eTheses Repository

Perceived effects of peer cooperation on motivation in the Japanese university EFL classroom

Tatsumoto, Mika (2011)
Ph.D. thesis, University of Birmingham.

Loading
Tatsumoto11PhD_full.pdf
PDF (1570Kb)

Restricted to Repository staff only until 31 July 2016.

Abstract

The main aim of this study was to explore whether or not low achievers in EFL at a Japanese university perceive peer cooperation in cooperative learning contexts to be effective in improving their levels of expectancy, motivation and ultimate attainment in the L2. The main findings in this study pertain to the relationship between peer cooperation and L2 classroom motivation. The relationship involved several perceived routes which mainly indicated that the learners felt that peer cooperation had had a positive influence on their levels of motivation. The perceived routes linking peer cooperation to motivation can be roughly divided into two types; 1) the two routes which were mainly focused on in this study: through expectancy alone or a combination of levels of English and expectancy; and 2) other routes identified during the course of the study: through group cohesion and/or cohesion-generated factors (a sense of responsibility for their peers and having fun in class) or through factors related to status ordering or hierarchy among students (feelings of superiority/inferiority to their peers).

Type of Work:Ph.D. thesis.
Supervisor(s):Littlemore, Jeannette
School/Faculty:Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Arts & Law
Department:School of English, Drama, American and Canadian Studies
Subjects:PE English
HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare
PI Oriental languages and literatures
BF Psychology
Institution:University of Birmingham
ID Code:1758
This unpublished thesis/dissertation is copyright of the author and/or third parties. The intellectual property rights of the author or third parties in respect of this work are as defined by The Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 or as modified by any successor legislation. Any use made of information contained in this thesis/dissertation must be in accordance with that legislation and must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the permission of the copyright holder.
Export Reference As : ASCII + BibTeX + Dublin Core + EndNote + HTML + METS + MODS + OpenURL Object + Reference Manager + Refer + RefWorks
Share this item :
QR Code for this page

Repository Staff Only: item control page