The SCERTS model: an exploration of educational psychology practice

Knight, Roseanna (2019). The SCERTS model: an exploration of educational psychology practice. University of Birmingham. Ap.Ed.&ChildPsy.D.

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Abstract

The SCERTS model is a comprehensive educational assessment and intervention approach for children and young people with autism. The name ‘SCERTS’ is derived from three domains of the approach: social communication, emotional regulation, and transactional support. The approach is designed to encourage collaboration during both assessment and intervention, working together towards shared child-centred outcomes. Current research focuses predominantly on the efficacy of the approach, however, there is a gap in understanding the use of the approach in practice. Whilst an intervention may be effective in theory, for it to be effective in practice it must also be functional within the working environment.

A pragmatic, mixed-methods approach was used to explore the use of the SCERTS model in an educational psychology service, examining the strengths and limitations of the approach, and the impact on practice. Questionnaires gathered information predominantly regarding the use of the approach. Focus groups gathered information regarding the use and impact of the approach on educational psychology practice. Descriptive and thematic analyses were used to interrogate the data, with key themes emerging relating to benefits and barriers to practice. The research concludes with recommendations to reduce the impact of the barriers raised and implications for educational psychology practice.

Type of Work: Thesis (Doctorates > Ap.Ed.&ChildPsy.D.)
Award Type: Doctorates > Ap.Ed.&ChildPsy.D.
Supervisor(s):
Supervisor(s)EmailORCID
Howe, JuliaUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Bozic, NicholasUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Licence: All rights reserved All rights reserved All rights reserved
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Social Sciences
School or Department: School of Education
Funders: None/not applicable
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
L Education > L Education (General)
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/9811

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