Sleep in children and adults with intellectual disabilities: association with daytime behaviour and parental wellbeing

Heald, Mary Elizabeth (2018). Sleep in children and adults with intellectual disabilities: association with daytime behaviour and parental wellbeing. University of Birmingham. Clin.Psy.D.

[img] Heald2019ClinPsyD_Vol_1.pdf
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[img] Heald2019ClinPsyD_Vol_2.pdf
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Abstract

This thesis consists of two volumes that are submitted as part of the Clinical Psychology Doctorate at the University of Birmingham. Volume one consists of three chapters which explore sleep in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) and the association with behaviour and parental wellbeing. The first chapter is a systematic review of the literature examining the association between sleep in individual with ID, and the association with aggression, self-injury and impulsivity. The focus of the second chapter is on two neurodevelopmental disorders associated with sleep difficulties: Angelman syndrome (AS) and Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS). This chapter examines the association between sleep and parental wellbeing. The final chapter is a document summarising the main findings from the first two chapters for public dissemination.

Volume two is comprised of five Clinical Practice Reports (CPRs) which were completed during the doctorate. CPR one is a comparison of two psychological models used to develop a formulation of a clinical case within an adult psychology service. CPR two is a service evaluation from the same setting, examining the implications of a service re-design. The third CPR describes a case study exploring the clinical issues arising from an intervention designed to target aggressive behaviour in a child with ID. The fourth CPR uses single experimental case design methodology to examine the use of a team formulation approach with an older adult with dementia exhibiting challenging behaviour. CPR five summarises a case study exploring clinical work conducted with a case from a child and adolescent mental health service.

Type of Work: Thesis (Doctorates > Clin.Psy.D.)
Award Type: Doctorates > Clin.Psy.D.
Supervisor(s):
Supervisor(s)EmailORCID
Oliver, ChristopherUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Richards, CarolineUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Licence: All rights reserved All rights reserved
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Life & Environmental Sciences
School or Department: School of Psychology
Funders: None/not applicable
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/8610

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