Understanding parenting groups: parents' experiences and objective change in parent-child interaction

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Vella, Lydia Roseanna (2015). Understanding parenting groups: parents' experiences and objective change in parent-child interaction. University of Birmingham. Clin.Psy.D.

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Abstract

The first chapter presents a systematic review of how parenting groups can impact observed parent-child interaction, focussing on the groups recommended to UK commissioners. Seventeen studies were identified, evaluating eight of the 21 recommended programmes. Sixteen studies reported post-intervention improvements in observed parent-child interaction. Most studies reported summary, rather than detailed, variables describing parent-child interaction. The findings suggest that several parenting groups are associated with observed improvement in parent-child interaction, although the level of evidence for different interventions is variable. Further research is required to understand the nature of changes in more detail.
The second chapter presents an Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis of parents' experience of participating in the Solihull Approach parenting group, "Understanding Your Child's Behaviour" (UYCB). Ten parents were interviewed after completing the group, and again ten months later. Four themes were identified: Satisfied Customers, Development as a Parent, Improved Self-belief, and the "Matthew Effect". The findings suggest that UYCB is achieving its aims and communicating its theoretical principles, although change also appears to occur through group processes found in other programmes. Positive outcomes appear to be maintained, even reinforced, ten months later. Recommendations for programme development include simplified language and separate groups for parents with complex needs.

Type of Work: Thesis (Doctorates > Clin.Psy.D.)
Award Type: Doctorates > Clin.Psy.D.
Supervisor(s):
Supervisor(s)EmailORCID
Law, Gary U.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Butterworth, RuthUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Licence:
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Life & Environmental Sciences
School or Department: School of Psychology
Funders: None/not applicable
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/5781

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