You are happy and safe: a discourse analysis of a diagnostic disclosure of dementia

Mahamed, Zuhura (2014). You are happy and safe: a discourse analysis of a diagnostic disclosure of dementia. University of Birmingham. Clin.Psy.D.

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Abstract

Research indicates that the way in which a clinical diagnosis is delivered impacts on the quality of life post diagnosis. This study explores local and global discursive influences on diagnostic feedback of dementia diagnosis across two NHS memory assessment services. Eight feedback sessions were audio-recorded over a three month period. The recordings were transcribed and analysed using a discourse analytic approach. The transcripts were analysed in terms of their interpersonal and wider discourse features and the ways in which meanings were constructed in the delivery of a dementia diagnosis. The findings suggest that carers, clients and practitioners construct dementia as largely a memory problem, drawing on wider discourses which associates memory with the mind, and that there are interpersonal advantages in downplaying the range of cognitive difficulties that dementia involves. Clinical implications such as post diagnosis procedures and the scope for future research examining the diagnostic delivery methods of different health professionals are presented.

Type of Work: Thesis (Doctorates > Clin.Psy.D.)
Award Type: Doctorates > Clin.Psy.D.
Supervisor(s):
Supervisor(s)EmailORCID
Oyebode, JanUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Licence:
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Life & Environmental Sciences
School or Department: School of Psychology
Funders: None/not applicable
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/5532

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