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RAMS management of railway systems

Park, Mun Gyu (2014)
Ph.D. thesis, University of Birmingham.

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Abstract

Railway RAMS is an engineering discipline that integrates reliability, availability, maintainability and safety characteristics into an inherent design property through systems engineering. This research is to establish a systematic approach of RAMS management for the railway systems engineering through the establishment of the engineering concepts, methods, techniques and tools. For this purpose, the research focuses on three subjects and a case study. Firstly, this research provides a RAMS management systems included railway systems engineering and RAMS management processes so that railway organisations can decide a strategic policy, control functions and coordinate activities related to RAMS management. Secondly, this research provides railway risk assessment methods to assess all of the potential hazards that threaten the railway’s operational objectives and control them within the possible acceptable criteria. Thirdly, this research provides the method that develops RAMS performance specifications appropriate to the RAMS requirements and operational contexts in order to develop RAMS design and its acceptance criteria for implementing the detailed design and/or contract. Finally, this research presents a case study for the risk assessment, using the data collected from the railway industry to demonstrate the proposed risk assessment method and to investigate the RAMS performance of the railway systems and their major failure causes.

Type of Work:Ph.D. thesis.
Supervisor(s):An, Min
School/Faculty:Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Engineering & Physical Sciences
Department:School of Civil Engineering
Subjects:TA Engineering (General). Civil engineering (General)
TF Railroad engineering and operation
Institution:University of Birmingham
ID Code:4750
This unpublished thesis/dissertation is copyright of the author and/or third parties. The intellectual property rights of the author or third parties in respect of this work are as defined by The Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 or as modified by any successor legislation. Any use made of information contained in this thesis/dissertation must be in accordance with that legislation and must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the permission of the copyright holder.
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