Applying the behavioural epidemiology framework to investigate sedentary behaviour and physical activity in rheumatoid arthritis

O'Brien, Ciara ORCID: 0000-0002-2215-6001 (2020). Applying the behavioural epidemiology framework to investigate sedentary behaviour and physical activity in rheumatoid arthritis. University of Birmingham. Ph.D.

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Abstract

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease, characterised by high-grade inflammation. People with RA experience pain, fatigue, functional disability and compromised psychological well-being. These patients typically spend long periods of the day engaged in sedentary behaviour, which may exacerbate negative RA health outcomes. This thesis was guided by the Behavioural Epidemiology Framework, and provided novel evidence in the field of sedentary behaviour research in RA. Primarily, the activPAL and ActiGraph accelerometer were validated for measurement of sedentary time and physical activity (PA) in RA (Chapter 2). These devices were subsequently employed in the longitudinal study comprising Chapters 4-6. In Chapter 4, longitudinal associations were revealed between several clinically- and patient-important RA outcomes with sedentary, standing and stepping time. These relationships were largely bi-directional. Grounded in self-determination theory, Chapter 5 demonstrated that autonomous motivation to reduce sedentary behaviour was negatively associated with sedentary time, and positively related to time engaged in standing, stepping and light-intensity PA in RA. Chapter 6 tested hypothesised models of sedentary behaviour change, which suggested fostering autonomous motivation to reduce sedentary behaviour in people with RA, may promote changes in sedentarity to the extent that it might attenuate the burden of disease in this patient group.

Type of Work: Thesis (Doctorates > Ph.D.)
Award Type: Doctorates > Ph.D.
Supervisor(s):
Supervisor(s)EmailORCID
Fenton, SallyUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Duda 1955-, Joan L. (Joan Lynne)UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Kitas, GeorgeUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Licence: All rights reserved All rights reserved
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Life & Environmental Sciences
School or Department: School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences
Funders: None/not applicable
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/9961

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