Mathematical modelling and energy conversion efficiency analysis of scroll air motors and its application to a pneumatic-electrical system

Luo, Xing (2011). Mathematical modelling and energy conversion efficiency analysis of scroll air motors and its application to a pneumatic-electrical system. University of Birmingham. Ph.D.

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Abstract

In industry, pneumatic actuating systems have been widely employed due to their distinct advantages. However, pneumatic actuators have rather low energy efficiency, around 23-30% in general. The work described in this thesis is to study potential strategies for improvement of pneumatic actuator energy efficiency by recovering the exhaust air energy using a scroll-type air motor. The scroll-type air motor is a relatively new technology, and its unique compact structure determines that it can work at high energy efficiency. The mathematical models for vane-type air motors with arbitrary number of vanes and for scroll-type air motors are derived, which cover their thermodynamic process and responses. A complete mathematical model for the pneumatic-electrical system is developed. The simulation studies are carried for initial investigation of the working process for the electrical-pneumatic system and its dynamic responses. A closed-loop control strategy is proved to be essential. An experimental test rig for this system has been built in the laboratory, and the test results are described. The simulation study and the laboratory test results demonstrate that the proposed system is realistic for energy recovery while a proper control strategy is imposed and the overall system energy efficiency can be improved under reasonable constraint conditions.

Type of Work: Thesis (Doctorates > Ph.D.)
Award Type: Doctorates > Ph.D.
Supervisor(s):
Supervisor(s)EmailORCID
Wang, JihongUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Licence:
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Engineering & Physical Sciences
School or Department: School of Engineering, Department of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering
Funders: None/not applicable
Subjects: T Technology > TK Electrical engineering. Electronics Nuclear engineering
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/984

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