We do have a voice: using a Personal Construct Psychology technique to explore how children and young people with Selective Mutism construct their current and 'ideal' selves

Strong, Emily Victoria (2019). We do have a voice: using a Personal Construct Psychology technique to explore how children and young people with Selective Mutism construct their current and 'ideal' selves. University of Birmingham. Ap.Ed.&ChildPsy.D.

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Abstract

Within published Selective Mutism (SM) research, few studies have gained the views of children and young people (CYP) with SM themselves, meaning their unique experiences are largely missing from the literature. Whilst contextual non-speaking may restrict traditional ‘pupil voice’ interview approaches, alternative non-verbal methods should be sought to enable CYP with SM to be involved in decision-making and person-centred planning regarding their future.

In this study, five CYP with SM were interviewed, using an adaptation of the Personal Construct Psychology technique ‘Drawing the Ideal Self’ (Moran, 2001), to explore how they constructed their current and ‘ideal’ selves, their ‘movement’ over time, and their goals for the future. This was done without the need for verbal communication. Common themes were identified regarding CYP’s ‘non-speaking’ selves, their desire to change, factors which had contributed to their SM, factors which had helped and hindered progress over time, and their action plans for the future, which addressed the research questions. Conclusions advocate that educational psychologists are well placed to support CYP with SM using this novel technique and implications for future research and practice in this area are considered.

Type of Work: Thesis (Doctorates > Ap.Ed.&ChildPsy.D.)
Award Type: Doctorates > Ap.Ed.&ChildPsy.D.
Supervisor(s):
Supervisor(s)EmailORCID
Soan, ColetteUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Soni, AnitaUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Licence: All rights reserved All rights reserved All rights reserved
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Social Sciences
School or Department: School of Education, Department of Disability, Inclusion and Special Needs
Funders: None/not applicable
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
L Education > L Education (General)
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/9559

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