Shattered assumptions, attachment, social support and other risk factors for the development of symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) following childbirth: a comparison of women in Saudi Arabia and the UK

Alhussainan, Fahdah (2019). Shattered assumptions, attachment, social support and other risk factors for the development of symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) following childbirth: a comparison of women in Saudi Arabia and the UK. University of Birmingham. Ph.D.

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Abstract

Some women develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following childbirth (FC). No Saudi studies have been carried out in. This project had five main aims, to: 1) review the current PTSD measures and identify the suitable one to use in this research; 2) compare the prevalence rate of PTSD symptoms FC among new mothers in Saudi Arabia and Britain; 3) examine the risk factors and association between assumptions, religion, social support, anxiety, depression and PTSD FC up to one year; 4) examine the role of adult attachment style in the development of PTSD FC and its relationship with bonding; and 5) to observe changes in PTSD symptoms for two years post-childbirth. 532 (408 Saudi and 124 British) new mothers were recruited online and from clinics. 55 women from the first sample were followed for an additional year to examine changes in PTSD symptoms across time. Results demonstrated that the PDS (Foa et al., 1997) is a good tool for assessing PTSD FC. Postpartum PTSD may affect around 14% of women in both countries. There were significant relationships between postpartum PTSD symptoms and more dysfunctional assumptions about the world, higher anxiety, higher depression, and less social support across both cultures. New mothers with an insecure attachment style are also more likely to be at greater risk of developing PTSD symptoms FC and those with higher PTSD symptoms have poorer bonding with their infant. PTSD symptoms are relatively stable up to two years postpartum. Cultural differences occurred throughout these relationships.

Type of Work: Thesis (Doctorates > Ph.D.)
Award Type: Doctorates > Ph.D.
Supervisor(s):
Supervisor(s)EmailORCID
Blissett, JackieUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Grunfeld, BethUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Julal Cnossen, FayUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Licence: All rights reserved
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Life & Environmental Sciences
School or Department: School of Psychology
Funders: None/not applicable
Other Funders: king Saud University, Saudi Arabia
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/8806

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