Family caregivers of people with an acquired brain injury: attributions of challenging behaviour and psychological interventions for emotional wellbeing

Major, Grace (2018). Family caregivers of people with an acquired brain injury: attributions of challenging behaviour and psychological interventions for emotional wellbeing. University of Birmingham. Foren.Clin.Psy.D.

[img] Major18ForenClinPsyD_Vol_1.pdf
Text - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 10 May 2028.

Download (978kB) | Request a copy
[img] Major18ForenClinPsyD_Vol_2.pdf
Text - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 1 December 2028.

Download (1MB) | Request a copy

Abstract

Objective: To use Weiner's attributional model of helping behaviour to investigate the relationship between causal attributions of challenging behaviour, emotional response and propensity to help in family caregivers of people with acquired brain injury.

Method: Twenty four male and female caregivers, aged 29-73 years, were recruited through Headway, a charitable organisation. Participants completed an online questionnaire, giving information on the type of challenging behaviour they had witnessed in the previous month. They rated their attributions, emotions (anger and sympathy) and propensity to help in relation to this behaviour. Correlational and mediation analyses were utilised to examine relationships between key variables.

Results: No significant correlations were found between attributions, emotions and propensity to help, with the exception of anger and sympathy and helping. Emotions did not mediate the relationship between attributions and propensity to help.

Conclusion: Whilst Weiner's model (I 980; 1985) may be applicable to other populations, there was little evidence for its application in family caregivers of people with ABI. Attributions may not be the most important determinant of willingness to help in family caregivers. Methodological issues are explored and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Type of Work: Thesis (Doctorates > Foren.Clin.Psy.D.)
Award Type: Doctorates > Foren.Clin.Psy.D.
Licence:
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Life & Environmental Sciences
School or Department: School of Psychology
Funders: None/not applicable
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/8505

Actions

Request a Correction Request a Correction
View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year