Essays on affirmative action policies in employment in India

Prashar, Neha (2018). Essays on affirmative action policies in employment in India. University of Birmingham. Ph.D.

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Abstract

This thesis analyses the effect of affirmative action policies on targeted groups in India. A robust analysis of the impact of public sector employment quotas for lower caste groups and women is estimated. Chapter 1 focuses on the effect association with these quotas has on lower caste groups and results show not all targeted groups benefit from the policy. Chapter 2 analyses the effect of women’s reservation policy in public employment and results show that there is some movement by women into the labour force. The biggest effect is the movement from private to public sector, putting into question the effectiveness of the policy in increasing female labour force participation rates. The final chapter then extends Chapter 2 to look at the effect of having a female friendly state, by using reservation policy as proxy for this, and women’s working status on incidences of domestic violence. Results show that women’s working status reduces incidences of domestic violence and more female friendly states have a lower likelihood associated with violence. Further to this, it is found that domestic violence increases when women earn more than men. Overall, results are mixed and possible policy recommendations are also outlined in each chapter.

Type of Work: Thesis (Doctorates > Ph.D.)
Award Type: Doctorates > Ph.D.
Supervisor(s):
Supervisor(s)EmailORCID
Henry, MichaelUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Bandyopadhyay, SiddharthaUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Licence:
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Social Sciences
School or Department: Birmingham Business School, Department of Economics
Funders: Other
Other Funders: The University of Birmingham
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HC Economic History and Conditions
H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/8256

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