Developing an understanding of factors that may play a role in the aetiology of higher order repetitive behaviours in individuals with intellectual disabilities

Sohal, Gurpavnjit Kaur (2017). Developing an understanding of factors that may play a role in the aetiology of higher order repetitive behaviours in individuals with intellectual disabilities. University of Birmingham. Clin.Psy.D.

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Abstract

The paper provides an overview of the Literature Review and Empirical Paper.
The Literature Review explores higher-order repetitive behaviours in individuals with an intellectual disability and measured processes that may play an aetiological role in repetitive behaviour. Nineteen studies were selected for review based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. The review demonstrates that higher-order repetitive behaviour (HRB) has been associated with biological, cognitive and sensory constructs, specifically basal ganglia structural volume, executive functions and sensory sensitivity. Few causal inferences could be made, a finding which appears to be associated with the large number of factors shown to impact on repetitive behaviour.
The Empirical Paper aimed to pilot a battery of thirteen executive functioning tests with individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). Twelve individuals were administered a computerised executive function battery. Feasibility: none of the participants completed the entire EF battery, two completed nine of the thirteen subtasks. Convergent validity: No clear difference was evidenced in the EF battery between high IS and low IS individuals. Concurrent validity: Little consistency found between standardised measure of behavioural indicators of executive dysfunction, and corresponding tasks of the EF battery. The findings provide important information to direct development of the EF battery to ensure sustained motivation and make completion more feasible for participants of lower developmental levels.

Type of Work: Thesis (Doctorates > Clin.Psy.D.)
Award Type: Doctorates > Clin.Psy.D.
Supervisor(s):
Supervisor(s)EmailORCID
Woodcock, KateUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Oliver, ChristopherUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Licence:
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Life & Environmental Sciences
School or Department: School of Psychology
Funders: None/not applicable
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/7644

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