Which wolf to feed? Exploring clinicians’ experiences of hope and recovery whilst working with individuals with first episode psychosis

Christopher, Rose (2016). Which wolf to feed? Exploring clinicians’ experiences of hope and recovery whilst working with individuals with first episode psychosis. University of Birmingham. Clin.Psy.D.

[img] Christopher16ClinPsyD_Vol_1.pdf
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[img] Christopher16ClinPsyD_Vol_2.pdf
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Abstract

This thesis contains the academic work submitted by the author as part of the DClinPsych program.
Volume One contains a review of the literature regarding staff attitudes towards psychosis and the potential impact of these, an empirical paper investigating clinicians' experiences of recovery from psychosis whilst working in Early Intervention for Psychosis, using an Interpretive Phenomenological approach and public dissemination document surmising the findings of the above.
Volume Two consists of four written clinical practice reports and a summary of a verbal presentation exemplifying the applications of psychological theory and skills in practice. The first clinical practice report illustrates the formulation of a 24 year-old male with a learning disability from a systemic and behavioural perspective. Secondly, a service evaluation of community behavioural support team for adults with a learning disability is presented. Third, a leadership and consultancy clinical practice report of delivering clinical supervision to a nursing colleague. The fourth clinical practice report utilises a single case experimental design to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural intervention for anxiety in an older adults inpatient setting. The final clinical practice report is the abstract from an oral presentation of working with a female adult client from a dialectical behavioural perspective.

Type of Work: Thesis (Doctorates > Clin.Psy.D.)
Award Type: Doctorates > Clin.Psy.D.
Supervisor(s):
Supervisor(s)EmailORCID
Larkin 1971-, MichaelUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Licence:
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Life & Environmental Sciences
School or Department: School of Psychology
Funders: None/not applicable
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/7009

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