Predictors and outcomes of eating disorders

Stanbury, Alexandra (2015). Predictors and outcomes of eating disorders. University of Birmingham. Clin.Psy.D.

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Abstract

PART I- SYSTEMATIC REVIEW: Examines whether women with active or remissive eating disorders are more vulnerable to pregnancy and delivery complications than women without, according to the current literature. Drawing from four electronic databases, 15 papers were evaluated for their quality and findings. Generally, there was no substantial evidence to support previous claims that women with eating disorders are more at risk, though outcome measures were variable and conclusions were therefore difficult. Implications for medical practice are discussed.
PART II- EMPIRICAL PAPER: Investigates the mediating role in the relationship between early parental rearing styles and the development of eating disorders. Online recruitment drawing from clinical and non-clinical samples yielded 130 and 114 respondents respectively. Upon completion of three tools measuring early parental styles, emotion regulation and eating difficulties, data was entered into a mediator model using bootstrapped parameter estimates and confidence intervals. Results revealed that specific emotion regulation deficits were important mediators though they played distinctly different roles in the clinical and non-clinical samples. Tentative explanations are hypothesized and implications for the treatment focus of women with eating disorders are offered.

Type of Work: Thesis (Doctorates > Clin.Psy.D.)
Award Type: Doctorates > Clin.Psy.D.
Supervisor(s):
Supervisor(s)EmailORCID
Jones, ChristopherUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Licence:
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Life & Environmental Sciences
School or Department: School of Psychology
Funders: None/not applicable
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/6401

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