Tracing change in a micro activity system: an activity-based genre conceptual framework

Ayers, Gael (2015). Tracing change in a micro activity system: an activity-based genre conceptual framework. University of Birmingham. M.Phil.

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Abstract

The overall objectives of this study were to assess the usefulness of an activity-genre approach, and conceive a multi-dimensional/multi-perspective framework, which could go some way in capturing the complexities of human object-directed activity. In particular, research concentrated on (i.) how a. the (‘power’) relations between participants, and b. factors concerning ‘culture’ and ‘identity’, can shape the activity system as a whole, and its different parts or elements, and (ii.) how genre contributes to the patterning and contingency of an activity system. In the formulation of the framework, and to identify and describe the different features, new notions and terms were introduced and defined, involving a number of differentiations of concepts. The framework was applied to a micro activity system, that of an astrology group (the case study), based in Lazio, Italy. It revealed how genre was used in \(configuration\) to both negotiate ‘power relations’ between participants and further the Object/motive of the Activity System. ‘Communicative purpose’ of a genre was created through a whole array of modes e.g. ‘size’, colour, position within the room, its relation to other genres, indicating the importance of ‘situated analysis’. The analysis indicated a complex layering of time and space, local and global culture cross-fertilizing.

Type of Work: Thesis (Masters by Research > M.Phil.)
Award Type: Masters by Research > M.Phil.
Supervisor(s):
Supervisor(s)EmailORCID
Koester, AlmutUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Licence:
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Arts & Law
School or Department: School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies, Department of English Language and Linguistics
Funders: None/not applicable
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > B Philosophy (General)
H Social Sciences > HS Societies secret benevolent etc
P Language and Literature > P Philology. Linguistics
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/5998

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