Watching queer television: a case study of the representation, circulation and reception of sexual dissidence on Italian mainstream TV from 1990 to 2012

Malici, Luca (2015). Watching queer television: a case study of the representation, circulation and reception of sexual dissidence on Italian mainstream TV from 1990 to 2012. University of Birmingham. Ph.D.

[img] Malici15PhD.pdf
PDF - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 1 January 2021.

Download (5MB) | Request a copy

Abstract

This thesis explores the increasing representation of sexual dissidence on contemporary Italian mainstream television from 1990 to 2012. It argues that TV programming and regulations have been historically influenced by notions of an ideal family audience assumed to be traditionally nuclear, patriarchal, heterosexual and normative.

The visual representation of sexuality in the media has been the subject of considerable international debate which has problematised the historical invisibilisation and misrepresentation of sexual dissidents, particularly in film and with an almost exclusive methodological emphasis on Anglophone texts. Less attention has been given to more integrated and empirical approaches to the representation, circulation and reception of dissident sexualities on TV.

This study combines historical examinations of sexual portrayals on Italian television with two online ethnographies targeting non-heterosexual and heterosexually-identified respondents, discursively analysing whether and how these samples of viewers have engaged with this increasing TV visibility.

The majority of participants seem interested in these portrayals and disagree with restrictive decision-making by networks. Nonetheless, a considerable portion of respondents appears to be problematically influenced not so much by the content of programmes as by perceptions of the views of others.

The thesis demonstrates that audience research is an under-explored, yet very productive, field of enquiry in Sexuality Studies. Further research in this direction could have implications for network recommendations, transnational policy-making and new theoretical approaches.

Type of Work: Thesis (Doctorates > Ph.D.)
Award Type: Doctorates > Ph.D.
Supervisor(s):
Supervisor(s)EmailORCID
Ross, CharlotteUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Licence:
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Arts & Law
School or Department: School of Languages, Cultures, Art History and Music, Department of Modern Languages
Funders: None/not applicable
Subjects: D History General and Old World > DG Italy
H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
P Language and Literature > PN Literature (General) > PN1990 Broadcasting
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/5725

Actions

Request a Correction Request a Correction
View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year