The role of childhood trauma and shame in social anxiety and paranoia within an early intervention in psychosis population

Aherne, Keith (2014). The role of childhood trauma and shame in social anxiety and paranoia within an early intervention in psychosis population. University of Birmingham. Clin.Psy.D.

[img]
Preview
Aherne14ClinPsyD_volume_one.pdf
PDF - Redacted Version

Download (1MB)
[img] Aherne14ClinPsyD_volume_two.pdf
PDF - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 1 December 2024.

Download (1MB)

Abstract

Explores the relationship of childhood trauma and shame in social anxiety and paranoia within a first episode in psychosis population, utilising quantitative methodology. It was found that both paranoia and social anxiety were strongly linked with shame, but external shame in particular. The relationship between childhood adversity and social anxiety and paranoia was highly correlated, and this association was significantly moderated by shame. No specific type of shame emerged as an amplifier of this relationship. This indicated that shame is a key variable for those who experience social anxiety and paranoia following a first episode of psychosis. However, models that propose these social fears can be differentiated via distinct shame pathways have not been fully supported. It was concluded that the high amount of social anxiety and paranoia in this group may be reflective of shaming developmental adversity and shame associated with having a psychotic illness.

Also a literature review looks at the role of shame in psychosis. Findings suggest that shame is highly linked to emotional dysfuntion, and impacts negatively on recovery from a psychotic episode. Methodological issues around measurement are raised as a limitation within the literature.

Type of Work: Thesis (Doctorates > Clin.Psy.D.)
Award Type: Doctorates > Clin.Psy.D.
Supervisor(s):
Supervisor(s)EmailORCID
Bernard, MarkUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Jones, ChristopherUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Licence:
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Life & Environmental Sciences
School or Department: School of Psychology
Funders: None/not applicable
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/5404

Actions

Request a Correction Request a Correction
View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year