Chlorine quenching phenomena and the application of fluorescence spectroscopy in drinking water

Al-Janabi, Shahad Sadeq (2013). Chlorine quenching phenomena and the application of fluorescence spectroscopy in drinking water. University of Birmingham. Ph.D.

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Abstract

The purpose of this study is to examine and understand the chlorine quenching phenomena and the application of fluorescence spectroscopy under chlorinated and rechlorinated conditions.
Partially treated water samples were collected from various water treatment works and dosed with range of initial chlorine concentrations. Measurements of the residual chlorine, fluorescence intensities and THMs were conducted simultaneously at specific time intervals until residual chlorine deplete to below detection limits.
Results show the maximum quenching of fluorescence intensity is between 10% and 60% of the initial intensity value. The quenching amounts were found to increase proportionally to an increase in the initial chlorine dosage. The organic matter (OM) reaction pathway with respect to chlorine was found to consist of three phases; a rapid decrease in intensity, a slow steady decrease in intensity, and a recovery or steady state. The fluorescence quenching mechanisms static and dynamic were found to be associated with the OM reaction pathway. The OM intensity was used to develop an effective model to predict THMs. The quenching Stern-Volmer models were found to be valuable and straightforward for calculating the chlorine consumption in drinking water. Finally rechlorination conditions showed increase in the amount of quenched intensity with low chlorine dosage.

Type of Work: Thesis (Doctorates > Ph.D.)
Award Type: Doctorates > Ph.D.
Supervisor(s):
Supervisor(s)EmailORCID
Bridgeman, JohnUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Sterling, MarkUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Baker, AndrewUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Licence:
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Engineering & Physical Sciences
School or Department: School of Engineering, Department of Civil Engineering
Funders: None/not applicable
Subjects: Q Science > QD Chemistry
T Technology > TA Engineering (General). Civil engineering (General)
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/3887

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