Understanding and influencing dietary self-care in chronic illness

Ho, Cornelia (2012). Understanding and influencing dietary self-care in chronic illness. University of Birmingham. Clin.Psy.D.

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Abstract

Objectives
Coeliac Disease (CD) is a common chronic autoimmune disorder characterised by sensitivity to gluten. This study investigated the relationships between CD illness representations, coping, self-efficacy, health related quality of life, wellbeing, psychological distress and dietary self-care (following a gluten free diet) among adults with coeliac disease.

Design
A questionnaire-based correlation design was used to investigate the hypothesised relationships between illness representations and outcomes.

Methods
Ninety six adults with CD, recruited through dietician clinics, completed a single booklet of questionnaires about their beliefs, experiences and behaviour in relation to their CD. In addition serology (CD antibody levels) and clinician rated levels of dietary self-care (both taken within one month of participation) were employed as additional measures of behaviour.

Results
Results of regression analyses showed that some aspects of illness representation, particularly estimates of consequences and emotional impact were related to some psychosocial outcomes but not levels of dietary self-care (which was generally high among the sample).

Conclusions
Illness representations may be useful in explaining some psychosocial outcome for CD, but more research would be needed to assess whether they are useful in explaining dietary behaviour among this population. Findings related to coping and self-efficacy are also discussed.

Type of Work: Thesis (Doctorates > Clin.Psy.D.)
Award Type: Doctorates > Clin.Psy.D.
Supervisor(s):
Supervisor(s)EmailORCID
Howard, RuthUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Oyebode, JanUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Licence:
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Life & Environmental Sciences
School or Department: School of Psychology
Funders: None/not applicable
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/3848

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