Economic evaluation of smoking cessation interventions for pregnant women

Saygın Avşar, Tuba ORCID: 0000-0002-4143-3852 (2020). Economic evaluation of smoking cessation interventions for pregnant women. University of Birmingham. Ph.D.

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Abstract

Smoking during pregnancy (SDP) is a significant health problem, associated with high healthcare costs and health inequalities. Current SDP interventions are typically cost-effective, but their uptake, content and outcomes are very limited. This thesis aimed to produce evidence to identify the characteristics of ‘optimum’ SDP interventions, relating to aims (achieving smoke-free households or reducing smoking in the pregnant woman), content (higher financial incentives and more intense behavioural support) and longer duration.

A Markov-based economic model was developed, which extended an existing model by incorporating partners’ smoking and the number of cigarettes consumed. A systematic umbrella review informed inclusion of additional health conditions. Three hypothetical interventions were designed based on available evidence, and cost-utility analysis was undertaken to assess their outcomes, healthcare costs and long-term cost-effectiveness compared to standard NHS care. Additionally, a qualitative study in an international public health organisation explored the applicability of high-income country-based economic evidence on SDP interventions in low and middle-income countries (LMICs).

The economic modelling found that the hypothetical cessation interventions would greatly extend reach, reduce smoking, address inequalities, and be cost-effective. Piloting of SDP interventions based on this research would be warranted by UK policy-makers, and the findings have potential applicability to LMICs settings.

Type of Work: Thesis (Doctorates > Ph.D.)
Award Type: Doctorates > Ph.D.
Supervisor(s):
Supervisor(s)EmailORCID
McLeod, HughUNSPECIFIEDorcid.org/0000-0002-2266-7303
Jackson, LouiseUNSPECIFIEDorcid.org/0000-0001-8492-0020
Barton, PelhamUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Licence: All rights reserved All rights reserved
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Medical & Dental Sciences
School or Department: School of Health and Population Sciences, Health Economics Unit
Funders: Other
Other Funders: Turkish Ministry of National Education
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/11043

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