An analysis of the shape of the spine and torso in those with and without scoliosis

Gardner, Adrian Christopher ORCID: 0000-0001-6532-7950 (2020). An analysis of the shape of the spine and torso in those with and without scoliosis. University of Birmingham. Ph.D.

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Abstract

Abstract The shape of the spine and torso are central to the management of scoliosis, a condition with a three-dimensional rotation in the spine associated with asymmetry of the torso. It is not clear what the variability in shape and symmetry of both the spine and the torso is in a non-scoliotic cohort. Using ISIS2 surface topography, the torsos of a non-scoliotic cohort were measured yearly for seven years, allowing true longitudinal analysis. Parameters of growth and symmetry were measured and analysed to demonstrate the variability of normal shape during the adolescent growth spurt using linear mixed effect modelling and data ellipses, examining for the effects of age and sex. This demonstrated a range of normal shape and the differences between males and females. The non-scoliotic shape was then analysed alongside a group of matched pre and post-operative scoliotic subjects using data ellipses and Procrustes analysis. This showed that scoliosis increases the asymmetry of the spine and torso as an amplification of the variability in the non-scoliotic cohort. This asymmetry is reduced by surgery in nearly all parameters measured. However, some appreciable differences remain when compared to the non-scoliotic cohort.

Type of Work: Thesis (Doctorates > Ph.D.)
Award Type: Doctorates > Ph.D.
Supervisor(s):
Supervisor(s)EmailORCID
Pynsent, Paul B.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Kumar, PremUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Wilton, JoanneUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Licence: All rights reserved All rights reserved
College/Faculty: Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Medical & Dental Sciences
School or Department: Institute of Clinical Sciences
Funders: Other
Other Funders: Birmingham Orthopaedic Charity, The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
Subjects: Q Science > QM Human anatomy
R Medicine > RD Surgery
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics > RJ101 Child Health. Child health services
URI: http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/id/eprint/10030

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