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Children, young people and coeliac disease

Theodosi, Eleni (2009)
Clin.Psy.D. thesis, University of Birmingham.

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Abstract

Volume I comprises a review of the literature about children and young people with Coeliac Disease, a common autoimmune disease characterised by an immune response to the protein gluten, found in wheat, barley and rye. It also comprises a qualitative research paper detailing interviews with young people that aimed to tap their lived experiences of the disease. The final part of Volume I comprise a public domain briefing paper summarising both the literature review and research paper. The literature review considers the evidence for problems with adherence to treatment (a lifelong diet free from gluten) for young people with Coeliac Disease as well as psychological effects of having the disease in childhood. Studies of parental views were also included. The results suggested that there is some element of psychological distress associated with having CD in childhood, and that adherence to the treatment appears to be influenced by age and gender. Studies of parents’ views about their child’s Coeliac Disease suggested that parents’ belief in their ability to manage the disease is important to how young children adhere to treatment. The research project describes how 5 children and young people were recruited and interviewed about their experiences of living with Coeliac Disease. The resulting data were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis and two themes were subsequently identified. These themes related to identity as a young person with Coeliac Disease and to perceptions about food. Volume II comprises five Clinical Practice Reports: Clinical Practice Report 1 describes the “challenging behaviour” of a 42 year old man with learning disabilities. Subsequently, formulations of this behaviour from a behavioural and a systemic perspective are presented. Clinical Practice Report 2 is a service evaluation conducted in the Heart of Birmingham that aimed to measure outcomes for adults with a learning disability, as well as considering outcomes separately for different ethnic groups. Clinical Practice Report 3 is a case study of a 16 year old girl with anger difficulties using CBT within the Solihull Approach model. Clinical Practice Report 4 describes cognitive-behavioural intervention with a 39-year old man suffering with anxiety as a result of residual psychotic symptoms. Clinical Practice Report 5 was an oral presentation of a piece of clinical work completed with staff at a day hospital for older adults, conducted in order to help the staff adjust in their move to a new location.

Type of Work:Clin.Psy.D. thesis.
Supervisor(s):Howard, Ruth and Law, Gary U.
School/Faculty:Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Life & Environmental Sciences
Department:School of Psychology, Department of Clinical Psychology
Keywords:Psychological, psychosocial, adherence, quality of life
Subjects:BF Psychology
RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Institution:University of Birmingham
Library Catalogue:Check for printed version of this thesis
ID Code:949
This unpublished thesis/dissertation is copyright of the author and/or third parties. The intellectual property rights of the author or third parties in respect of this work are as defined by The Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 or as modified by any successor legislation. Any use made of information contained in this thesis/dissertation must be in accordance with that legislation and must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the permission of the copyright holder.
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