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Buoyancy-driven oscillations in helio- and asteroseismology

Kuszlewicz, James Stevenson (2017)
Ph.D. thesis, University of Birmingham.

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Abstract

This thesis focuses on the application of asteroseismology to red giants observed with Kepler alongside searching for solar g-modes using the Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network (BiSON). In the case of the Sun, solar gravity modes are highly sought after because they can shed light on the inner rotation profile of the Sun. This thesis contains work showing how the low frequency regime of BiSON data has been cleaned enabling the search to be made in BiSON data without instrumental artefacts. Moving onwards along the stars evolution, thanks to space mission such as Kepler and CoRoT tens of thousands of red giant stars have been observed allowing huge ensemble investigations. The ability to use high-quality, long datasets as constraints to shorter and noiser datasets has been investigated through fitting the background power of 6000 Kepler red giants. Red giants also offer the opportunity to study the inclination angle distribution of stars to confirm that the distribution conforms to the expected isotropy used in many simulations. This can be extended to inferring the obliquity through asteroseismology, as applied to a red-giant, M-dwarf eclipsing binary. This offering a means to probe obliquity distributions in in a different regime to that using traditional spectroscopic techniques.

Type of Work:Ph.D. thesis.
Supervisor(s):Chaplin, William J. and Davies, Guy
School/Faculty:Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Engineering & Physical Sciences
Department:School of Physics and Astronomy
Additional Information:

Publications arising from thesis:

Kuszlewicz J., Davies G. R., Chaplin W. J., 2015, in European Physical Journal Web of Conferences. p. 06041
http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/epjconf/201510106041

Subjects:QB Astronomy
QC Physics
Institution:University of Birmingham
ID Code:7658
This unpublished thesis/dissertation is copyright of the author and/or third parties. The intellectual property rights of the author or third parties in respect of this work are as defined by The Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 or as modified by any successor legislation. Any use made of information contained in this thesis/dissertation must be in accordance with that legislation and must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the permission of the copyright holder.
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