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Development and performance characterisation of high concentrating multi-junction PV/Thermal technology

Aldossary, Abdulrahman S. (2017)
Ph.D. thesis, University of Birmingham.

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Abstract

Multi-Junction (MJ) solar cells are new generation of Photovoltaic (PV) technology with high efficiency, better response to high solar concentration and lower temperature coefficients. MJ cells are integrated with high concentrating optical systems to maximise their power output. However, high concentration of solar radiation can lead to significant increase in the cells temperature thus cooling is essential which offers potential for heat recovery leading to the development of High Concentrator PV/Thermal (HCPV/T) systems. This thesis presents a detailed investigation of the MJ based HCPV/T optical, electrical and thermal performance.
The performance analysis of HCPV/T integrating
0.25x0.25 m\(^2\) Fresnel lens under concentration ratios of 425X (X=1000 W/m\(^2\)) was carried out to estimate the maximum power output that can be collected. It was found that the yearly total power yield can be up to 191.25 kWh. Therefore, 184 units of HCPV/T, which occupy only 11.5 m\(^2\), can generate 35,190 kWh. Also, in comparison to the flat plate Silicon PV module with electrical efficiency of 20% and 1.2x0.8 m\(^2\) area, HCPV/T system can save about 76% of the area needed to meet this demand. On the other hand, in terms of pollution these units can displace about 23 tons of CO\(_2\) every year.

Type of Work:Ph.D. thesis.
Supervisor(s):Al-Dadah, Raya
School/Faculty:Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Engineering & Physical Sciences
Department:Department of Mechanical Engineering
Subjects:TJ Mechanical engineering and machinery
Institution:University of Birmingham
ID Code:7382
This unpublished thesis/dissertation is copyright of the author and/or third parties. The intellectual property rights of the author or third parties in respect of this work are as defined by The Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 or as modified by any successor legislation. Any use made of information contained in this thesis/dissertation must be in accordance with that legislation and must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the permission of the copyright holder.
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