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The text of Romans, second Corinthians, and Galatians in the writings of Origen of Alexandria

Steinfeld, Matthew Richard (2016)
Ph.D. thesis, University of Birmingham.

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Abstract

This thesis gathers and analyzes Origen of Alexandria's citations of Romans, 2 Corinthians and Galatians in order to gain a better understanding of the nature of the New Testament text in the second and third centuries. Throughout the transmission process of Origen’s writings, it is possible that the wording of his citations has undergone alteration that relates to changes in the New Testament transmission. Origen’s citations are analyzed to determine whether his citations, as they are found today, first transmit the text quoted by the author, and, second, are likely to be a reflection of his biblical manuscripts. If Origen’s authorial citations can be demonstrated to be from his biblical exemplars, it is only then that his citational text can be compared with New Testament manuscripts for the purposes of establishing textual affinity. If Origen’s citations cannot be used to establish his biblical text, then his use as a witness to specific text-forms should be reconsidered. However, his citations still reveal the transmission history of his writings, specifically how they have undergone alteration in light of the historical and theological environments of his editors. The thesis concludes that Origen, despite often corresponding to the Initial text and Byzantine text agreements, cited freely with little extant manuscript support. This suggests that his authorial citations have been accommodated to a text form similar to that of the Initial text and then the Byzantine text through subsequent transmission.

Type of Work:Ph.D. thesis.
Supervisor(s):Houghton, H.A.G.
School/Faculty:Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Arts & Law
Department:School of Philosophy, Theology, and Religion
Subjects:BS The Bible
Institution:University of Birmingham
ID Code:6554
This unpublished thesis/dissertation is copyright of the author and/or third parties. The intellectual property rights of the author or third parties in respect of this work are as defined by The Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 or as modified by any successor legislation. Any use made of information contained in this thesis/dissertation must be in accordance with that legislation and must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the permission of the copyright holder.
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