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Neutron Compton scattering from hydrogen and perovskite oxide interfaces

Lemon, Christopher P. (2010)
Ph.D. thesis, University of Birmingham.

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Abstract

In this thesis we investigate two independent topics: neutron Compton scattering from hydrogen and perovskite oxide interfaces. Part one is an investigation of the scattering of high energy neutrons from hydrogen compounds. The motivation for this investigation stems from neutron Compton scattering experiments, performed with the VESUVIO neutron spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron source, which report an anomalously reduced cross section for hydrogen. We explore the possibility that electronic excitation is responsible for the discrepancy between conventional theory and experiment. We conclude that the effect of electronic excitation on the scattering is small, at the energies relevant to the experiments, and therefore cannot account for the anomalies. Part two is an investigation of two perovskite oxide interfaces: a cuprate-manganite interface, and the interface between SrTiO\(_3\) and LaAlO\(_3\). Both interfaces are investigated using the techniques of impurity theory. Firstly, a simple model of a cuprate-manganite interface is proposed to explain several recent experiments. By applying the idea that the metallicity of the manganite spills out into the cuprate, we provide a theoretical interpretation of the unusual electronic and magnetic properties observed at the interface. Finally, a simple model of the SrTiO\(_3\)-LaAlO\(_3\) interface is investigated. Two ingredients are contained within this model: the orbital physics of the titanates, and the long range coulomb interactions produced by the polar discontinuity at the interface. From this model, we predict a two dimensional layer of charge confined to the interface, which is consistent with experimental observations.

Type of Work:Ph.D. thesis.
Supervisor(s):Long, Martin and Gidopoulos, N. I.
School/Faculty:Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Engineering & Physical Sciences
Department:School of Physics and Astronomy
Subjects:QC Physics
Institution:University of Birmingham
ID Code:593
This unpublished thesis/dissertation is copyright of the author and/or third parties. The intellectual property rights of the author or third parties in respect of this work are as defined by The Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 or as modified by any successor legislation. Any use made of information contained in this thesis/dissertation must be in accordance with that legislation and must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the permission of the copyright holder.
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