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Depressive symptoms in adolescents with type 1 diabetes

Bali, Kiran (2014)
Clin.Psy.D. thesis, University of Birmingham.

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Bali14ClinPsyD_Vol_1.pdf
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Bali14ClinPsyD_Vol_2.pdf
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Abstract

Adolescents with T1D are more vulnerable to developing depressive symptoms than their peers and the presence of depressive symptoms can have a negative influence on the self-management of T1D. It is therefore important to gain an understanding of the processes that underlie depressive symptoms in adolescents with T1D and also to examine the relationship between depressive symptoms and metabolic control. A systematic literature review is presented that synthesized and evaluated evidence on the longitudinal relationship between depressive symptoms and metabolic control in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. The main focus was on issues of directionality within this relationship over time and identifying factors that may influence identified longitudinal associations. An empirical paper that investigated the role of cognitions proposed by Beck’s cognitive theory of depression (1967) and Bandura’s social cognitive theory (1997) in depressive symptoms in adolescents with T1D is also presented. Further research exploring depressive symptoms in adolescents with T1D is required.

Type of Work:Clin.Psy.D. thesis.
Supervisor(s):Law, Gary U. and Nouwen, Arie
School/Faculty:Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Life & Environmental Sciences
Department:School of Psychology
Subjects:B Philosophy (General)
RJ101 Child Health. Child health services
Institution:University of Birmingham
ID Code:5300
This unpublished thesis/dissertation is copyright of the author and/or third parties. The intellectual property rights of the author or third parties in respect of this work are as defined by The Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 or as modified by any successor legislation. Any use made of information contained in this thesis/dissertation must be in accordance with that legislation and must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the permission of the copyright holder.
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