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Grain production and utilization in Russia and the USSR before collectivisation

Wheatcroft, S.G. (1980)
Ph.D. thesis, University of Birmingham.

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Abstract

This thesis is concerned with analysing the available data on grain production and its utilisation from the time when the earliest grain statistics became available in pre-revolutionary Russia until the eve of mass transformation of Soviet agriculture that was associated with mass collectivisation in 1929. The pre-revolutionary period and post revolutionary period are treated separately in two separate parts of the thesis. In each part I describe the methods of collecting and organising statistics related to the production and utilisation of grain. I discuss the circumstances in which these statistics were gathered and I attempt to assess the reliability of these data and place them in a more meaningful and more comparative form. I then present an account of the available works that have attempted to analyse the balance of grain production and its utilisation. I conclude by making my own assessment of the balance and compare it with the general conceptions held on the nature of the grain problem. I conclude that the balance of grain production and utilisation was a highly complex phenomenon dependent upon the inter-relationship of demographic, economic and agronomic factors that differed from region to region and from time to time. The full complexity of these inter-relationships was little understood by the political leadership of the time.

Type of Work:Ph.D. thesis.
Supervisor(s):Davies, R. W. (Robert William), (1925-)
School/Faculty:Faculties (to 1997) > Faculty of Commerce and Social Sciences
Department:Centre for Russian and East European Studies
Subjects:DK Russia. Soviet Union. Former Soviet Republics
HD Industries. Land use. Labor
Institution:University of Birmingham
Library Catalogue:Check for printed version of this thesis
ID Code:530
This unpublished thesis/dissertation is copyright of the author and/or third parties. The intellectual property rights of the author or third parties in respect of this work are as defined by The Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 or as modified by any successor legislation. Any use made of information contained in this thesis/dissertation must be in accordance with that legislation and must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the permission of the copyright holder.
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