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Joining of NiTi-based shape memory alloys to Ti-6Al-4V

Routledge, David Philip (2013)
Eng.D. thesis, University of Birmingham.

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Abstract

NiTi-based shape memory alloys (SMAs) have been developed as high power density micro-actuators for small scale and/or light weight actuation systems; this provides opportunities for actuators to be installed in regions where conventional actuators are unattractive due to their size, weight or power consumption. SMA based actuators could be applied across a greater range of applications if the SMA that provides the force could be joined to other light weight engineering materials, such as Ti-6Al-4V.
The scope of this work is to describe the reasons why conventional fusion based welding and brazing procedures fail to provide strong joints between Ti-6Al-4V and NiTi-based SMAs, then detail a novel brazing method that can join these materials. This novel joining method involves using a localised heating method to braze the parent metals together. This localised brazing method prevents the shape memory properties from being compromised. The strength of the joints produced in this work have been related to their microstructure, which in turn have been related to the processing steps used to produce the joint. A study of the processing parameters was conducted to investigate the potential of this method as a large scale production joining method.

Type of Work:Eng.D. thesis.
Supervisor(s):Strangwood, Martin
School/Faculty:Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Engineering & Physical Sciences
Department:School of Metallurgy and Materials
Subjects:TJ Mechanical engineering and machinery
TL Motor vehicles. Aeronautics. Astronautics
TN Mining engineering. Metallurgy
Institution:University of Birmingham
ID Code:4262
This unpublished thesis/dissertation is copyright of the author and/or third parties. The intellectual property rights of the author or third parties in respect of this work are as defined by The Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 or as modified by any successor legislation. Any use made of information contained in this thesis/dissertation must be in accordance with that legislation and must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the permission of the copyright holder.
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