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An exploration of nurse education leadership as identified and experienced by nurse teachers working in the field of nurse education

Coates, Alison (2012)
Ed.D. thesis, University of Birmingham.

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Abstract

This research is an exploration of nurse education leadership, as identified and experienced by nurse teachers working in a Higher Education (HE) environment. In total 18 nurse teachers were interviewed who formed a whole population sample. The author is identified as a coworker and part of the community being researched. Semi-structured interviews and field notes were used to triangulate the data and thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. From the findings, the interviewees can be seen to have a strong professional focus and look to their own health and nursing structures to provide leadership. The acceptance of the authority of these institutions and people can be broadly located in a bureaucratic model. Their expectations of people they identified as leaders conforms to a transformational model of leadership, as they identified that leaders were people who had vision, values and influence and of particular importance was the identification of how these individuals made them feel valued. They identified themselves as problematic within the HE environment in which they work and identify being excluded from the collegiate structures and working practices of the university. The findings illuminate problems in the identification and role of nurse education leadership and their position within the university, which this author suggests are areas that need further exploration and have policy implications.

Type of Work:Ed.D. thesis.
Supervisor(s):Bisschoff, Thomas
School/Faculty:Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Social Sciences
Department:School of Education
Subjects:LB2300 Higher Education
LC Special aspects of education
RT Nursing
Institution:University of Birmingham
ID Code:3785
This unpublished thesis/dissertation is copyright of the author and/or third parties. The intellectual property rights of the author or third parties in respect of this work are as defined by The Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 or as modified by any successor legislation. Any use made of information contained in this thesis/dissertation must be in accordance with that legislation and must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the permission of the copyright holder.
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