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Synchronised range queries

Suryanarayanan, Vinoth (2012)
Ph.D. thesis, University of Birmingham.

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Abstract

Computer simulations have been used more than ever before to embark on developing and understanding complex systems such as Multi-Agent Systems (MAS). As simulation systems become larger and more complex, scalability becomes an important issue for their successful deployment. PDES-MAS (Parallel and Discrete Event Simulations for Multi-Agent Systems) framework is, implemented based on distributed shared memory architecture, a parallel and discrete event simulation kernel to distribute and run parallel simulation of Multi-Agent Systems (MAS). There are several issues within such system and this thesis presents a notion of logical time synchronised range queries to address the issue of data access. Accessing data efficiently in a latency-sensitive and large scale network overlay is a vital requirement for the scalability of the system. So, this thesis presents a notion of synchronised range queries with algorithms to manage distributed data structures consistently and in a time ordered fashion across the system. To localise data access in such a large scale simulation system, algorithms are provided to distribute shared state such that the distribution reflects access patterns of simulating nodes. The algorithms are evaluated within the implementation of PDES-MAS framework using various agent based simulation traces.

Type of Work:Ph.D. thesis.
Supervisor(s):Theodoropoulos, Georgios
School/Faculty:Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Engineering & Physical Sciences
Department:School of Computer Science
Subjects:QA75 Electronic computers. Computer science
QA76 Computer software
ZA Information resources
Institution:University of Birmingham
ID Code:3768
This unpublished thesis/dissertation is copyright of the author and/or third parties. The intellectual property rights of the author or third parties in respect of this work are as defined by The Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 or as modified by any successor legislation. Any use made of information contained in this thesis/dissertation must be in accordance with that legislation and must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the permission of the copyright holder.
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