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Structural analysis and design of cold formed steel sigma purlins

Liu, Qiang (2012)
Ph.D. thesis, University of Birmingham.

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Abstract

Cold formed steel (CFS) sigma sections are commonly used as purlins in the construction of modern industrial and residential buildings due to their excellent strength-to-weight ratio. This thesis reports investigations on the structural behaviour of CFS sigma purlins in three different parts of modern roof systems. In the first investigation, the pre-buckling, buckling, post-buckling and post-failure behaviour of continuous CFS sigma purlins near internal supports was studied by experimental and numerical methods. In the second investigation, the moment-rotation response as well as the moment resistance of the sleeve connection of sigma purlins was studied by laboratory tests. Engineering models were developed to predict the behaviour of this connection and a good correlation was observed with the experimental data. In the third investigation, the flexural stiffness and moment resistance of CFS sigma purlins fastened to roof sheeting with large screw spacing was studied experimentally. The purlin-sheeting assemblies were subjected to both downward and uplift loadings, from which different behavioural aspects such as flexural stiffness, failure modes and ultimate load were examined. Test results are utilized to develop design proposals for sigma purlins that codes or standards have not yet covered.

Type of Work:Ph.D. thesis.
Supervisor(s):Yang, Jian
School/Faculty:Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Engineering & Physical Sciences
Department:School of Civil Engineering
Subjects:TA Engineering (General). Civil engineering (General)
TH Building construction
Institution:University of Birmingham
ID Code:3364
This unpublished thesis/dissertation is copyright of the author and/or third parties. The intellectual property rights of the author or third parties in respect of this work are as defined by The Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 or as modified by any successor legislation. Any use made of information contained in this thesis/dissertation must be in accordance with that legislation and must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the permission of the copyright holder.
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