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An investigation into the discourses of secondary aged girls’ emotions and emotional difficulties

Howe, Julia (2009)
Ed.D. thesis, University of Birmingham.

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Abstract

The aim of this research was to investigate how the emotions and emotional difficulties of secondary aged girls are constructed by teachers and the girls themselves, through the investigation of the discourses surrounding girls’ emotions. The rationale for choosing this topic was the difference in the numbers of girls and boys referred to educational support services in the U.K. in order to access support and provision for behavioural, emotional and social difficulties. The research used ideas from social constructionism (Gergen,2001) and feminist poststructuralism (Weedon, 1999), in order to explore how the emotions of secondary aged girls are constructed. Two research methods were used; focus groups with Year 9 girls and semi-structured interviews with their teachers. Discourse analysis was used in order to explore the discourses that were employed by the girls and their teachers when constructing the emotions and emotional difficulties of pupils. The findings suggest that the analysis of constructions of emotion and gender in schools can contribute to an understanding of gender differences in referral rates to support services. The limitations of the research findings and their relevance to the role of the educational psychologist are also considered.

Type of Work:Ed.D. thesis.
School/Faculty:Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Social Sciences
Department:School of Education
Subjects:LB1603 Secondary Education. High schools
BF Psychology
Institution:University of Birmingham
ID Code:325
This unpublished thesis/dissertation is copyright of the author and/or third parties. The intellectual property rights of the author or third parties in respect of this work are as defined by The Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 or as modified by any successor legislation. Any use made of information contained in this thesis/dissertation must be in accordance with that legislation and must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the permission of the copyright holder.
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