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Portfolio of compositions

Clay, Jeremy David (2012)
Other thesis, University of Birmingham.

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Clay12MMus.pdf
PDF (2179Kb)
01_Contraction_[workshop,_not_final_version].mp3
02_Until_the_Middle.mp3
Audio (MP3) (14Mb)
03_A_Little_Character.mp3
Audio (MP3) (23Mb)
04_Dancing_with_girls_by_the_cemetery.mp3
05_Appendix_1_-_Subverting_Garcia.mp3
06_Appendix_2_-_Watch_My_Flight.mp3

Abstract

This thesis and portfolio of compositions is an investigation into the possibilities of reusing ideas from past music, specifically those used in the field of dance. It looks at the role neoclassical ideas can have in postmodern music, particularly the reworking of Stravinskian techniques. Alongside this it investigates the ways in which postmodern composers can engage their audience (including the use of rhythmic repetition and ostinati and recognisable patterns) and the role of the performer. It also looks into the role of the musical work in an holistic way, considering the perceptions of the audience in live performance, particularly with regards the visual aspect of a performance. In addition, the ideas of Roger Scruton regarding the act of listening and understanding music are investigated, and his notion of 'dancing in an imagined space' is explored.

Type of Work:MMus thesis.
School/Faculty:Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Arts & Law
Department:Department of Music
Additional Information:

The thesis comprises a written Commentary together with scores and audio recordings. The audio recordings provided here are for study purposes. Full versions are available from the author. The original thesis, including all scores and audio recordings, is available for reference use in the University of Birmingham Main Library. Study versions of the recordings are available to download as MP3 files, and some are also available on the composer's website: http://jeremyclaymusic.com/

Subjects:M Music
Institution:University of Birmingham
ID Code:3237
This unpublished thesis/dissertation is copyright of the author and/or third parties. The intellectual property rights of the author or third parties in respect of this work are as defined by The Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 or as modified by any successor legislation. Any use made of information contained in this thesis/dissertation must be in accordance with that legislation and must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the permission of the copyright holder.
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