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Smart piezoelectric devices for X-ray optics applications

Rodríguez Sanmartín, Daniel (2011)
Ph.D. thesis, University of Birmingham.

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Abstract

The development of active/adaptive X-ray optics, utilising piezoelectric actuation for the focussing of X-rays in large and small scale applications, has been studied as part of the UK Smart X-Ray Optics (SXO) consortium.
For laboratory based X-ray sources utilising micro structured optical arrays (MOAs), a novel spider actuator structure, compatible with silicon wet etching of MOAs, has been developed. Test spider samples (20x20x0.100mm) have been bent to a 6.5cm radius using unimorph actuators, and to a 3cm radius without failure. FEA models predicted that a 4.5cm radius and +/-3mrad tip/tilt control of the MOAs could be obtained using unimorph actuators with segmented electrodes and optimized thickness, which would enable a tandem pair MOA configuration of suitable focal length.
A first generation prototype Wolter I optic for future high resolution X-ray telescopes exhibited kinks in the reflecting surface corresponding to the gaps between piezoelectric devices. FEA models have been used to develop second generation prototypes in which the gaps have been minimised or filled. These incorporate a brick wall arrangement of curved unimorph piezoelectric actuators (32x75x0.190mm) with radii from 160-200mm +/-6mm, manufactured using a VPP technique and laser machining for precise dimensional control.

Keywords: Smart X-ray optics (SXO), micro-structured optical arrays (MOAs), Wolter I X-ray optics, piezoelectric actuators, finite element analysis (FEA), viscous plastic processing (VPP).

Type of Work:Ph.D. thesis.
Supervisor(s):Button, Tim W
School/Faculty:Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Engineering & Physical Sciences
Department:School of Metallurgy and Materials
Subjects:T Technology (General)
TJ Mechanical engineering and machinery
Institution:University of Birmingham
ID Code:3193
This unpublished thesis/dissertation is copyright of the author and/or third parties. The intellectual property rights of the author or third parties in respect of this work are as defined by The Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 or as modified by any successor legislation. Any use made of information contained in this thesis/dissertation must be in accordance with that legislation and must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the permission of the copyright holder.
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