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An exploration of the implicit food attitudes of people with Type-1 Diabetes using reaction-time and electrophysiological measures

Huggins, Michele (2011)
Clin.Psy.D. thesis, University of Birmingham.

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Huggins_11_ClinPsyD_vol1.pdf
Huggins_11_ClinPsyD_vol1.pdf
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Huggins_11_ClinPsyD_vol2.pdf
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Abstract

People with type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have to be aware of their dietary intake for health reasons and this study aims to investigate whether their food attitudes are different from non diabetic controls. Adult participants with T1DM (n = 12) and non diabetic controls (n = 12) were recruited to this affective priming study on food attitudes. Participants were exposed to picture primes from 3 food categories (high-fat sweet, high-fat savoury and low-fat) and to pictures of non-food items (i.e. chair, ball). Brain activity was recorded during the affective priming task using EEG to explore electrophysiological differences between the groups. The results found positive implicit and explicit attitudes towards all food-types with no group differences. The EEG data focussed on N200, P300 and LPP ERP’s and group differences were observed for the N200 ERP. The T1DM group demonstrated a larger N200 than the control group in all food and non-food conditions suggesting that there are electro cortical differences in brain functioning between these two groups and reasons for this difference are presented.

Type of Work:Clin.Psy.D. thesis.
Supervisor(s):Nouwen, Arie
School/Faculty:Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Life & Environmental Sciences
Department:School of Psychology
Subjects:BF Psychology
Institution:University of Birmingham
ID Code:2880
This unpublished thesis/dissertation is copyright of the author and/or third parties. The intellectual property rights of the author or third parties in respect of this work are as defined by The Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 or as modified by any successor legislation. Any use made of information contained in this thesis/dissertation must be in accordance with that legislation and must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the permission of the copyright holder.
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