eTheses Repository

Health promotion in the field of substance misuse in post-Soviet Russia

Richardson, Erica Clare (2002)
Ph.D. thesis, University of Birmingham.

Loading
PDF (1744Kb)

Abstract

This thesis is an investigation into health promotion in post-Soviet Russia in the field of substance misuse defined as the problematic and chaotic as well as recreational use of alcohol, solvents and both prescription and illicit drugs. The thesis outlines and analyses developments in the provision of health promotion in Russia since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 in two areas: institutional shifts in the provision of health promotion (the relative and changing roles of state, non-state and international actors); and changes in content and form of health promotion messages. The hypothesis that health promotion in the field of substance misuse in post-Soviet Russia remains fixed within a medical model of health is tested through an analysis of the way in which health promotion is developing in two regions – Saratov and Sverdlovsk oblasts. The relative and changing roles of state, non-state and international actors in the development of health promotion interventions, and the way health education materials framed the issue of substance misuse, both illuminated significant barriers to the development of alternative community empowerment approaches and confirmed that the medical model of health is indeed still hegemonic among approaches to health promotion in post-Soviet Russia.

Type of Work:Ph.D. thesis.
Supervisor(s):Pilkington, Hilary (1964-)
School/Faculty:Schools (1998 to 2008) > School of Social Science
Department:Centre for Russian and East European Studies
Subjects:HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
H Social Sciences (General)
Institution:University of Birmingham
Library Catalogue:Check for printed version of this thesis
ID Code:232
This unpublished thesis/dissertation is copyright of the author and/or third parties. The intellectual property rights of the author or third parties in respect of this work are as defined by The Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 or as modified by any successor legislation. Any use made of information contained in this thesis/dissertation must be in accordance with that legislation and must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the permission of the copyright holder.
Export Reference As : ASCII + BibTeX + Dublin Core + EndNote + HTML + METS + MODS + OpenURL Object + Reference Manager + Refer + RefWorks
Share this item :
QR Code for this page

Repository Staff Only: item control page