eTheses Repository

Extracting terms from an English-Greek popular science parallel corpus for translation teaching purposes

Matsira, Maria (2008)
M.Phil. thesis, University of Birmingham.

Loading
PDF (645Kb)

Abstract

This thesis is focused on the compilation and analysis of a parallel corpus of popular science texts, i.e. articles appearing in a wide circulation popular science magazine and their translations. The stimulus of the research is translation teachers’ regular practice of using articles of this genre as teaching material. The goal of this study is to introduce a methodology for extracting terminology for translation teaching purposes, which can be easily understood and implemented by both translation teachers and students using readily available commercial software. Drawing on the fields of Corpus Linguistics, Translation Studies and Terminology on a theoretical level, this thesis follows the steps of 1) the creation of a translational English-Greek popular science corpus 2) its subdivision to smaller thematic sub-corpora and 3) its analysis (quantitative and qualitative) towards the extraction of candidate terms which, after being filtered through technical dictionaries, form single and multi-word term lists. Overall, this thesis outlines the procedure of decision-making steps taken to derive the keywords and the criteria employed for regarding them as terms.

Type of Work:M.Phil. thesis.
Supervisor(s):King, Philip
School/Faculty:Schools (1998 to 2008) > School of Humanities
Department:English
Keywords:Parallel corpus, terminology extraction, translation, keyword lists, candidate terms lists
Subjects:PE English
P Philology. Linguistics
Institution:University of Birmingham
Library Catalogue:Check for printed version of this thesis
ID Code:131
This unpublished thesis/dissertation is copyright of the author and/or third parties. The intellectual property rights of the author or third parties in respect of this work are as defined by The Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 or as modified by any successor legislation. Any use made of information contained in this thesis/dissertation must be in accordance with that legislation and must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the permission of the copyright holder.
Export Reference As : ASCII + BibTeX + Dublin Core + EndNote + HTML + METS + MODS + OpenURL Object + Reference Manager + Refer + RefWorks
Share this item :
QR Code for this page

Repository Staff Only: item control page