eTheses Repository

Monetary policy and the role of exchange rate: the case of Jordan

Mousa, Nabih Yosef Abdallaf (2010)
Ph.D. thesis, University of Birmingham.

Loading
PDF (5Mb)

Abstract

This thesis aimed at investigating the impact of changes in the exchange rate on the demand for money and the trade balance in Jordan. Using Johansen (1991 and 1995) approach for cointegration analysis and the equilibrium-correction model (ECM), we examined the existence of stable long-run relationships for the demand for money and the demand for exports and imports. Using the VAR analysis, we analyzed the potential channels of monetary policy transmission mechanism as a vehicle to evaluate the efficiency of monetary policy. A stable long-run relationship has been found for the narrowly defined money which is found positively related to domestic income and the exchange rate and negatively related to domestic real interest rate and foreign interest rate. A stable long-run relationship was also found for the demand of exports and imports. The volume of exports is positively related to income in the trade partner countries and negatively related to exports relative price. Similarly the volume of imports is positively related to domestic income and negatively related to imports relative price. The analysis of monetary policy transmission mechanisms revealed that actions of monetary policy in Jordan has little impact on either the channels of monetary transmission or on the ultimate targets of monetary policy.

Type of Work:Ph.D. thesis.
Supervisor(s):Ford, J. L. and Horsewood, N. (Nick)
School/Faculty:Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Social Sciences
Department:Department of Economics
Subjects:HF Commerce
HG Finance
HB Economic Theory
Institution:University of Birmingham
ID Code:1031
This unpublished thesis/dissertation is copyright of the author and/or third parties. The intellectual property rights of the author or third parties in respect of this work are as defined by The Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 or as modified by any successor legislation. Any use made of information contained in this thesis/dissertation must be in accordance with that legislation and must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the permission of the copyright holder.
Export Reference As : ASCII + BibTeX + Dublin Core + EndNote + HTML + METS + MODS + OpenURL Object + Reference Manager + Refer + RefWorks
Share this item :
QR Code for this page

Repository Staff Only: item control page